How much does raising a child impact your career?


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How much does raising a child affect your career?

When it comes to child rearing, men and women have different perspectives on the division of domestic labor – from cooking to emotional support – according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the Harris School of Public Policy. At the University of Chicago.

The new study also reveals important differences in how men and women perceive the impact of childbearing on work safety and workplace success. Mothers are more likely to say that they have more family responsibilities, while fathers are more likely to say that they share responsibilities equally with their partners.

Yana Galen, Assistant. The professor said, “In fact, 35 percent of mothers surveyed said they would do more than their partner for each of the eight household responsibilities, compared to only 3 percent of fathers who reported the same.”

Yana of the Harris School of Public Policy said, “While the gap between what mothers and fathers report is significant, it’s not what they expect before they have children – and that’s very interesting,” said Yana at the Harris School of Public Policy. By research. “Before becoming parents, most men and women expect that they will share the division of labor equally in all family activities, but their views differ on whether this is actually the case after having children.”

The perceived effects of having a child are relevant to the workplace, where half of working adults say having a child is an obstacle to employee progress, and about 4 out of 10 say the same about job security and opportunities. To raise

Americans’ attitudes toward children in the workplace are related to gender, with 47 percent of women saying having children compared to 36 percent of men is a barrier to job security. Similarly, adults earning less than $ 50,000 a year are more likely than high-income adults to say that having a child is a barrier to job security (50 percent vs. 35 percent) and job advancement (55 percent vs. 46 percent).

“Women and low-income Americans in particular may feel like they’re paying a fine at work for being a parent,” said David Stuart, a senior research scientist at the AP-NORC Center. “This comes in the form of limited job choices because the need for a schedule that accommodates parenting or low job security, these groups feel they are losing out on career opportunities compared to childless coworkers.” The survey also found that in order to manage their work and personal life, two-thirds of adults choose a job with a schedule that allows them to manage other responsibilities and 68% get support from friends or family.

And when thinking about whether to have children, more than 8 out of 10 Americans say they consider the importance of having a stable partner and a secure job. “Before becoming parents, most men and women expect that they will share equally in all family activities.”

Among the report’s core searches:

Forty-three percent of adults without a college degree say having a child is a barrier to growing up, whereas 32 percent of adults with a college degree say the same thing.

Parents are more likely than non-parents to choose a job with a schedule that allows them to manage their personal responsibilities, spend less time at their job focusing on friends or family, and ensure that their friends Have support or family.

Women are more likely than men to choose a job with a schedule so that they can manage their personal responsibilities (70 percent vs. 61 percent) and make sure they have the support of friends or family (73 percent vs. 64 percent).

Nearly three-quarters (74 percent) of childless Americans say having adequate savings is an important factor when thinking about deciding whether or not to have children, with 59 percent of parents saying it’s important.

Women are more likely than men to say that flexibility at work is important when thinking about having children (74 vs. 66 percent).

The study was conducted by the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, funded by the University of Chicago’s NORC.

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